User Survey

Based on the ideas generated by the team, we proceed to seek for second opinions, from possible end-users of course!

IMG_0026
Nickky hard at work, interviewing an elderly.

 

Below is a summary of the questions asked to the 20 over elderly we approached.

Objective: To find out if elder-lies are interested in a smart watch which notify them of nearby events.

Target: Elderly

Question Asked: If you were given a smart watch that notify you that an event nearby is happening and asked if they would like to participate in them.

Summarized Response: Majority of the elderly suggest that most people their age would not use the device due the intimidating factor of high-tech device such as a smart watch. Other than that the idea itself is good.


Objective: To find out if young adult are interested to use a smart watch which notify them of nearby events when are become older.

Target: Young adult

Question Asked: Imagine 40 years later, If you were given a smart watch that notify you that an event nearby is happening and asked if they would like to participate in them.

Summarized Response: Majority of the young adults responded positively and fully support the idea.


Objective: To find out if elder-lies are willing to do an implant of Nano sensor to let them test their physical limit.

Target: Elderly

Question Asked: If you are given a choice to do a body implant of Nano sensor to measure your physical limit so that you can enjoy activity within your capability, would you do it?

Summarized Response: One specific elderly guy specify the potential privacy consent.

One elderly explain that he only will do the implant if it is needed for him to pursue certain activity he wished to perform.

Majority of the elderly people interviewed see implant as foreign bodies and would not even consider regardless of where it is implanted.


Objective: To find out if young adult are interested to do an implant of Nano sensor to let them test their physical limit when are become older.

Target: Young adult

Question Asked: Imagine 40 years later, If you are given a choice to do a body implant of Nano sensor to measure your physical limit so that you can enjoy activity within your capability, would you do it?

Summarized Response: Majority of younger surveyees are on the edge of the idea due to privacy concerns but some are supportive of the potential that allows them to enjoy activity they might not have think of doing at that age.


Objective: To find out if people of all ages are willing to wear smart watch/ fitbit.

Target: People of all ages

Question Asked: Imagine 40 years later, If you are given a choice to do a body implant of Nano sensor to measure your physical limit so that you can enjoy activity within your capability, would you do it?

Summarized Response: Majority of younger surveyees are on the edge of the idea due to privacy concerns but some are supportive of the potential that allows them to enjoy activity they might not have think of doing at that age.

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Mini Challenge 2: The Problem Space

A possible unmet need is the need for the daily task performed by an older person to be verified. An elderly who has been diagnosed with dementia is typically unable to perform scheduled repeated tasks such as the consumption of medications without assistance from a physical caregiver. The consequences of the patient missing a drug dose or overdosing can be dire and may lead to death [1][2]. Existing designs to tackle this problem includes a typical reminder mobile app such as “Pill Organiser & Reminder” to remind the elderly to consume their medication, they can only verify that the notification is acknowledged by the elderly and unable to verify if the task is actually performed. A possible way to address this through interaction design is to change the form of interaction from the acknowledgement from the elderly user to change in weight or count of the medication container.

 

[1] Drug Overdose [Internet]. WebMD. WebMD; [cited 2016Aug20]. Available from: http://www.webmd.com/mental-health/addiction/drug-overdose?page=2

[2] Aricept Overdose [Internet]. eMedTV: Health Information Brought To Life. [cited 2016Aug20]. Available from: http://alzheimers.emedtv.com/aricept/aricept-overdose.html

 

 

 

GROWing our Design Concept

Here’s our take on making use of the GROW problem solving model!

We use the grow model after the we did our literature review on “healthy ageing” to allow the team to align on the same goal and identify what are the realities relevant to our goal. Taking the reality into account, we can then accurately identify the obstacles stopping the goal from being achieved and from there review the existing options that are available.

We can then for focus on the obstacles and attempt to tackle these using technology and review the options for the list of existing solutions that may be improvised.

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Setting the goal of the team and the realities involved.
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The obstacles we need to tackle and the options we could improvise.
 

It seems that our GROW is still short of something, stay tuned!

What is Healthy Ageing?

Since the challenge commenced, the team did their fair share of digging on various research papers and websites and this is what we know about healthy ageing at the point of writing.

The definition from WHO defines active aging as “the process of developing and maintaining the functional ability that enables well-being in older age”.

The team had a dialog in world cafe style to answer “what is healthy ageing?” to discuss the findings and we managed to summarize what we know about healthy ageing into 3 main aspects that an individual should not be deprived of due to social stigma.

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Setup we used for world cafe

The 3 main aspects are:

  1. Physical
  2. Mental
  3. Social

The team also summarized a list of approach currently used to tackle each of the aspects with heavy reference to the local context of Singapore.

Physical

  1. Diet control – Singapore’s health promotion board introduced a new toolkit to encourage positive changes to seniors’ diet
  2. Exercise – Promotion of exercise to elderly with “The Enabling Village”

Mental

  1. Board games – Mahjong simulating cognitive abilities
  2. Companionship – Combating loneliness 
  3. Religious events – Correlated with mental health

Social

  1. Dancing classes – Exercising with group allow socialising with group
  2. Singing – Building up social connectedness
  3. Community services – Befriending services